Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Forthcoming Events’ Category

Screen shot vote

Image by Unknown Artist, Brighton. Used under a creative commons licence.

This poster is one of many entered in Red Pepper magazine’s #EndToryRule election poster competition. You can view other entries on their website.

Read Full Post »

UoM%20scanned%20documentFollowing on from it’s small-but-perfectly-formed exhibition at the University of Manchester back in July 2016, Dr Sarah Marie Hall and Stef Bradley’s exhibition, Everyday Austerity, will be displayed at the Working Class Movement Library in Salford from 4th February until the 16th March.

If you didn’t see it last year, I heartily recommend that you see it at WCML. It is a very powerful, very inspiring piece of work that needs to be seen.

 

 

Read Full Post »

On Sunday 20th November the Working Class Movement Library in Salford is hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon around the fight for the right to vote, from Peterloo in 1818 to the lowering of the voting age in 1969.

The event, which is part of UK Parliament Week 2016, takes place at the Library on Sunday 20 November from 10am to 4pm – just bring a laptop and a packed lunch, and we’ll provide the coffee… It’s suitable for adults and young people, particularly for those with experience of editing Wikipedia or knowledge of British political history. The event, which is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund as part of the Library/Museum’s joint Collecting Cultures project, is free but advance booking is required via Eventbrite – http://votingforchangewiki.eventbrite.co.uk.

In a more specific context:

The event is being run in conjunction with Manchester Girl Geeks and in partnership with Wikimedia UK. John Lubbock, communications coordinator for Wikimedia UK, said: ‘Wikipedia is only as good as the people who are writing it, and for that reason we spend a lot of effort to engage groups of people who may not have traditionally considered contributing to the Web site. It is estimated that somewhere between 80 and 90% of the editors of English Wikipedia are men, and most of these would be European or North American. For this reason, you get a lot of content on Wikipedia which appeals to slightly geeky niche interests, but far less coverage of the lives of important historical women or the culture of ethnic minority communities. We aim to turn knowledge consumers into producers and authors of a new, engaged culture of knowledge production. So why not join in and help us realise this ambitious vision?’.

Secondly, but equally as importantly, in the shadow of last weeks events in America, and the feeling that the lights are going off not just all over America, but around the world… Hope Not Hate are organising a weekend of action 3rd and 4th December to spread their message in local communities.

If you’d like to help, you can register here: http://action.hopenothate.org.uk/weekend-of-action-2016-12

Post EU Referendum, a number of people (friends and acquaintances of mine , but also some journalists) have compared the vote for Trump to the vote in June for Brexit: The second horseman of the apocalypse has just ridden up, and who is that we see riding towards us on a third horse in the distance? Why, it’s Marine Le Pen…

Britain is experiencing a rise in racism and the far right feels confident and bullish. It is vital that we start providing people with an alternative message. There will be activities across the UK, with different leaflets and messages produced for different areas.

We are living in dark and difficult times but it is precisely at moments like this that we need to redouble our efforts and get organised.

On Sunday, as part of the Louder Than Words music literature festival, I was privileged to see a film made of 1986’s Red Wedge Tour, Days Like These. It was incredibly moving and inspiring and really makes you think… It is time to Get Busy again.

Read Full Post »

I seem to remember, back in May when the EU Referendum campaign was merely tedious rather than downright sinister, saying that even when the result came in, it wouldn’t be the end of the matter.

This was hardly a prediction on the scale of Nostradamus, but a series of forthcoming events have confirmed it good and proper.

The weekend of 3rd and 4th September will see two different sets of events from organisations and pressure groups that have been galvanised by the events of the Referendum campaign itself (specifically the murder of Jo Cox) and by the result and subsequent fallout, specifically the dramatic rise in reported hate crimes in the week prior to the result being announced, and in subsequent weeks and months since.

On September 3rd the group March For Europe are organising a number of marches around the country (but not in Manchester, or indeed, anywhere in the north or north west… suggesting Remain voters in the north have been forgotten about) as a follow up to their London march and demo in Green Park on 2nd July. The idea is for the Remain camp to keep the pressure on for when Parliament re-convenes on September 5th to discuss Brexit.

This might seem a bit futile, given Remain lost, but – as many a letter writer to Private Eye has pointed out over the past two months – had the boot been on the other foot, it’s unlikely Nigel Farage would have let it lie, and in a democracy the losing side have equal right to lobby as the winning side does. Whether you like the state of affairs this produces is a moot point: Democracy and all that.

The same weekend, Hope Not Hate are running a number of social events as part of their More In Common campaign, which was launched following the murder of Jo Cox and the announcement of the hate crime figures. These are being held across England and Wales, in most areas and are intended to

“bring people and communities together around what we have in common. It is an opportunity to celebrate our multicultural society but also to bridge divides between communities.”

The idea is to get communities together, and talking, to focus on what they have in common, not what divides them. A laudable and, given the horrible social climate we currently exist in, rather brave decision. Let’s hope it comes off.

In a bitter irony, the British Library is also hosting Punky Reggae Party: The Story of Rock Against Racism on Friday 9th September. This ties in not just with the ongoing 40 Years Of Punk series of events across London this year, but also with the publication of Daniel Rachel’s book Walls Come Tumbling Down: Rock Against Racism, Two Tone, Red Wedge, which is published by Picador on 8th September. Never have a book, or an event, felt more timely.

Read Full Post »

On Saturday 17th September, between 9:30am and 4pm, The Working Class Movement Library in Salford will be hosting a conference on the subject of  Radical Women 1880 – 1914.

As their newsletter puts it:

This one-day conference will celebrate the battles and achievements of working-class women in the drive to achieve a fairer and more balanced society. The decades spanning the turn of the twentieth century saw an upsurge in female activism as women began to organise themselves into trade unions, take part in the socialist debates on social and economic change, and demand the vote.

Radical women not only battled against the gender-conservative males within their family or community but also those who claimed to be fighting for equality.

Speakers include Professor Sheila Rowbotham, University of Manchester and Professor Karen Hunt, Keele University.

Whereas:

Papers include the Cabin Restaurant waitresses strike of 1908; the life of Crewe tailoress, campaigner, activitist and author Ada Neild Chew; the forgotten history of domestic servants in women’s suffrage; radical women and the bicycle; suffragette Constance Lytton and the cause of prison reform; plus many more.

Full programme details can be found on the WCML webpages

Tickets are £20 (£7.50 unwaged) and include lunch and refreshments.

Book in advance from trustees@wcml.org.uk

Read Full Post »

Cards on the table, I will be voting Remain on Thursday 23rd.

I have always known I would vote Remain, and nothing in the past six weeks or year has made me change my mind.

I was heartened to read this extract of the Piccadilly Records mail out earlier today:

20 years ago today Manchester suffered its own terrorist attack when the IRA detonated the largest bomb ever exploded on mainland Britain. Luckily no-one was killed, but many people were seriously injured, and the bomb devastated the city centre. Our shop (on Brown Street back then) was also badly damaged, with the front totally blown in.

The Northern Ireland Good Friday power sharing agreement is one of the many things that might be in jeopardy if the UK leaves the European Union. The EU isn’t perfect by any means, and needs reforming, but surely, in a global economy, we’d have better bargaining power as part of Europe. Also, the money that goes to the EU then gets redistributed around the UK, rather than all going on projects in London. The tram network in Manchester was built using European money. The regeneration in Salford has European backing. 1000s of jobs in the North depend on us trading with the EU. Lastly, do you really want Boris and Gove to be the leaders in a Tory government? Just make sure you all go and vote next Thursday!

I’ve also been trying to find a guide to the issues that is intelligent and not just a collage of hysterical slogans, voxpops and celebrity endorsements, and I think the one the Economist has put together comes close.

I also read The Economist‘s matter of fact guide to just how we would leave the EU, were it voted for and I recommend that you have a read of it, it makes for a sobering, dispassionate read.

I’m ending by including a link to this video from The Green Party as it’s one of the view to discuss EU membership from an environmental perspective.

Please vote on the 23rd.

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Tomorrow morning there will be a series of public protests at a number of railway stations around the country to protest the 2016 rail fair rises (which are officially announced tomorrow) and to provide support for the public ownership of the railways.

Protests are taking place within the Manchester and Greater Manchester area at the following locations:

Barrow in Furness, 6am – 10am

Manchester Piccadilly, 7:30am onwards

Preston, 7:30am onwards

You can see the full list and find out more at the Action For Rail website

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »